Pixel ID: 403533036647424

The wind this morning was just wild and the ship was racking and straining at the anchor as the waves rolled past. Yet there was still a race to be first into the sea for the mineral spa, the first two trainees in earning a chocolate fish. Tela and Casey beating the boys into the water again. By now most of us are beginning to wonder if Tela is part fish as she always seems to be first in the sea and the last out, as if it were her natural element !
Today we planned to complete as many lessons as possible whilst the weather was raining hard so that tomorrow it’s all play and no work as we journey up the coast. The weather gods were kind today as by the time the trainees were mentally saturated the sun came out and we headed out into the bay to play.
We braved the swells and wild water to visit Robberton Island and the world famous Cook’s Lookout. At this top of the world viewpoint the team practiced the Haka led by William and Joe Brown in preparation for greeting the visiting tallships when they arrive. Meanwhile the girls went rock pooling and Starz caught crabs. It was a monsterous fight moving rocks, boulders and much poking with sticks but she came up trumps and all onboard had a taste of crab for lunch,
Not wanting to waste the wind we set sail and stormed across the bay, Joe Brown at the helm, towards the Black Rocks and the western side of the bay. We eventually anchored in the Te Puna and prepared for a spot of Little Tuc racing, Little Tuc being our little green rowing dinghy. The rules are simple. Around the ship once swapping rowers half way around and don’t sink. If only it were that simple. Luke and Joe Booth disappeared into the distance down wind with Joe still spouting instructions but not remembering to row himself. Tela and Casey put up a great performance but were pipped to the post by Terry and Joe Brown who put up a truly professional performance at one minute four seconds.
So far we have left the fish undisturbed but tonight we decided to try our luck with the long line. Fingers crossed that very soon we have sixteen denizens of the deep flapping on our deck.